From Loner to Lighthouse

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Posted Sat, Dec 19, 2015

He taught me how to laugh in every situation and how life is too short

[Josh] taught me how to laugh in every situation and how life is too short. — Alyssa McCloskey

LITTLETON, Colo. — Joshua David Fisher, 22, passed away in a motorcycle accident in Poudre Canyon on Sept. 5, 2015.

Over the last year and a half of his life, Josh developed a passion for motorcycles and became an active member of the community. Every warm weekend was spent on his bike with other bikers who were part of a motorcycle meet up group.

Motorcycles, cars, travel and his faith dominated much of his life. Josh was a very relational being, constantly enjoying the company of others and playing a huge role in his church community where he helped lead the high school ministry at The Rock of Southwest.

Alyssa McCloskey was a student in the high school youth group a couple years ago when she met Josh. The two became very close friends and Josh was always there to lend an ear to listen and a shoulder to cry on.

“He was always there for people, even when they screwed him over. He taught me how to laugh in every situation and how life is too short, so to take every moment as if it were the last day,” McCloskey said.

Every warm weekend was spent on his bike with other bikers who were part of a motorcycle meet up group.

Josh Fisher spent warm weekends on his bike with other bikers who were part of a motorcycle meet up group.

Josh was a finance major at MSU Denver, although he never felt called to a specific career. He was frequently concerned and uncertain about his purpose in life.

Josh’s Friends would tell people that his purpose was making people laugh. The most notable memories all include a combination of outrageous facial expressions and fluid “Just Dance” moves accompanied by a wheezing, almost inaudible laugh. He had the impeccable talent of reciting spot-on impressions and drawing people in with his brazenness.

Brittany Spencer was just one of many friends Josh connected with through church. “My favorite personality trait was his desire for closeness with people. If Josh liked someone, he really liked them and would spend all of his free time with them,” Spencer said.

Though Josh struggled with depression, he was an illuminating light to others even when he was overwhelmed with darkness. As a passionate Christ-follower, Fisher led many friends to Christ through love and persistence. He always made himself available and was known for listening intently.

The most notable memories all include a combination of outrageous facial expressions and fluid Just Dance moves accompanied by a wheezing, almost inaudible laugh.

A combination of outrageous facial expressions and fluid “Just Dance” moves accompanied by a wheezing, an almost inaudible laugh, are notable traits remembered by Josh Fisher’s friends and family.

Throughout school Josh struggled with being bullied and feeling like an outcast. Since high school Josh was known for the unconditional acceptance that he offered others. Despite the lack of acceptance he received from his peers, he had the talent of making people feel comfortable and wanted.

“He transformed from the loner into the one who helped those who are like how he once was. I like how in the end he ended up helping who he once was,” said friend Josh Seonie.

At Josh’s funeral on Sept. 12, 2015, lines formed behind two open microphones to tell inspiring and hilarious memories. Tears and laughter filled the room and people learned that the young man had more of an impact on the lives of his friends, family, coworkers, church, neighbors, peers and strangers than a lot of people could show for a lifetime.

Joshua David Fisher is survived by his brother Sean, a freshman at the University of Wyoming, his mother Sharon, father Terry and two dogs, Max and Bella.

About Haley Black

Haley Black is a Denver-area journalist and freelance writer.

View all posts by Haley Black

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